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July 09, 2013

Medications that (Might) Help Tinnitus?

The blunt answer is that there is no drug or supplement that has been consistently found to help with tinnitus (ringing of the ears).

Here's a partial table showing all the research that has been done either proving or disproving effectiveness to treat tinnitus (info collected from this review paper).

For a more comprehensive list going over 17 drugs, click here.

Drug Research That Supports Research That Disputes Conclusion
Benzodiazepines (alprazolam, diazepam, clonazepam) #1, #2, #3, #4 #1, #2, #3 Caution due to addiction and may worsen tinnitus if stopped.
Antidepressants (nortriptyline, amitriptyline, trimipramine, sertraline, paroxetine) #1, #2, #3, #4, #5 #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6 TCA may benefit only in patients with depression symptoms
Anticonvulsants (carbamazepine, gabapentin, vigabatrin, tiagabine) #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, #7, #8, #9 #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, #7 Mixed results
Antiglutamatergics (caroverine, memantine, acamprosate) #1, #2, #3, #4 #1, #2, #3, #4 No conclusion.
(Anti)Dopaminergics (sulpiride, piribedil) #1, #2, #3 #1 Studies are weak.
Ginkgo Biloba #1, #2 #1, #2, #3 Not effective.
Melatonin #1, #2, #3 #1 Potentially helpful.

For more meds, click here.

Fauquier blog
Fauquier ENT

Dr. Christopher Chang is a private practice otolaryngology, head & neck surgeon specializing in the treatment of problems related to the ear, nose, and throat. Located in Warrenton, VA about 45 minutes west of Washington DC, he also provides inhalant allergy testing/treatment, hearing tests, and dispenses hearing aids. Google+ Christopher Chang, MD Bio

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